Concussions

 

Everton America takes the issue of concussions seriously as the safety and health of players is paramount importance.

All full-time Everton America coaches have taken the CDC's HEADS UP online concussion training course, or more advanced training, in addition to their regular first aid qualifications

Concussions are a risk in any sport, so it is the responsibility of all parents and players also to educate themselves on the risks of concussions, how to recognize a possible concussion during play, and the treatment of concussions.

Everton America recommends that all players and parents take the CDC's straightforward online course which will advance their understanding of concussions. 

From January 1, 2016, soccer clubs in Connecticut are required to provide concussion information to players and their parents. As such, this becomes part of Everton America's registration process for all programs.

 

 

Click HERE for an information sheet for athletes/parents from the CDC (in English). Click HERE for Spanish version.

Click HERE for a fact sheet for parents from the CDC (in English). Click HERE for Spanish version.

 

 

The following information is provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

 

How Can I Recognize a Possible Concussion?

To help recognize a concussion, you should watch for the following two things:

A forceful bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body that results in rapid movement of the head.

AND

Any change in the athlete’s behavior, thinking, or physical functioning.

 

Signs Observed by Coaching Staff

Appears dazed or stunned

Is confused about assignment or position

Forgets an instruction

Is unsure of game, score, or opponent

Moves clumsily

Answers questions slowly

Loses consciousness (even briefly)

Shows mood, behavior, or personality changes

Can’t recall events prior to hit or fall

Can’t recall events after hit or fall

 

Symptoms Reported by Athlete

Headache or “pressure” in head

Nausea or vomiting

Balance problems or dizziness

Double or blurry vision

Sensitivity to light

Sensitivity to noise

Feeling sluggish, hazy, foggy, or groggy

Concentration or memory problems

Confusion

Does not “feel right” or is “feeling down”

 

Athletes who experience any of the signs and symptoms after a bump, blow, or jolt to the head or body should be kept out of play the day of the injury and until a health care professional, experienced in evaluating for concussion, says they are symptom-free and it’s OK to return to play.

 

 

 

(Updated 12/11/2015)